tombstone blues

"THE CHINESE GRAVEYARD"; SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS

"As Arnold points out, there is an otherwise inexplicable shift in direction in the Piccadilly line passing east out of South Kensington. “In fact,” she writes, “the tunnel curves between Knightsbridge and South Kensington stations because it was impossible to drill through the mass of skeletal remains buried in Hyde Park.” I will admit that I think she means “between Knightsbridge and Hyde Park Corner”—although there is apparently a “small plague pit dating from around 1664” beneath Knightsbridge Green—but I will defer to Arnold’s research.

But to put that another way, the ground was so solidly packed with the interlocked skeletons of 17th-century victims of the Great Plague that the Tube’s 19th-century excavation teams couldn’t even hack their way through them all. The Tube thus had to swerve to the side along a subterranean detour in order to avoid this huge congested knot of skulls, ribs, legs, and arms tangled in the soil—an artificial geology made of people, caught in the throat of greater London."
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London and Its Dead

i read shit like this and think what could my imagination possibly have to add

like how do i write something about london that’s weirder than london already is?

(via weunderstandthelights)

I am taking the Piccadilly line to the airport tomorrow and wow, do I have something to think about now.

(via axonsandsynapses)

wanderingsilently:

Explored parts of an old abandoned girls school and came to a pretty creepy discovery in the bathroom… I just hope that’s paint.

sixpenceee:

Lake View Cemetery: The Haserot Angel 

It’s called the Angel of Death Victorious. Due to an effect of weathering and erosion on the bronze, the statue appears to be weeping black tears at all times. 

katemaldonado:

The World Needs Bad Men © Kate Maldonado
Etsy Shop | facebook | flickr | twitter

katemaldonado:

The World Needs Bad Men © Kate Maldonado

Etsy Shop | facebook | flickr | twitter

unexplained-events:

Codex Seraphinianus

Written in a strange language by Italian architect, Luigi Serafini in 1981. This is one of the strangest encyclopedia ever written.It consists of hand-drawn, colored-pencil illustrations of bizarre and fantastical world. All of it drawn by Serafini himself. Some of the illustrations are considered to be beautiful while others are considered to be a bit more on the disturbing side. 

The only thing known for sure about this book is that “Seraphinianus” is a variation of the author’s name. The alpahabet has about two-dozen characters which relate to nothing else humanity has ever seen.

winterfellis:

stones by Mustekala5 on Flickr.

shredsandpatches:

amorbidwitch:

Heidelberger Totentanz Author: Unknown Printer: Heinrich Knoblochtzer, 1488 

SKELETON PARTY

shredsandpatches:

amorbidwitch:

Heidelberger Totentanz
Author: Unknown
Printer: Heinrich Knoblochtzer, 1488 

SKELETON PARTY

ianference:

Sometimes you find the darnedest things lying about abandoned buildings… on the second floor of the Fort Totten Army Hospital in Queens, I found this plastic riding grasshopper.  How this object got into a building that had been abandoned for decades is beyond me - the documents on how to zero a .50 caliber machine gun in the basement at least made sense!

ianference:

Sometimes you find the darnedest things lying about abandoned buildings… on the second floor of the Fort Totten Army Hospital in Queens, I found this plastic riding grasshopper.  How this object got into a building that had been abandoned for decades is beyond me - the documents on how to zero a .50 caliber machine gun in the basement at least made sense!

gothiccharmschool:

Semi-guilty confession time: I eventually want to get a portrait done in the classic gothic romance cover heroine style. It would be so much fun!

(Yes, I’m married to a very talented artist, but this particular style isn’t at ALL the sort of thing he does.)

asylum-art:

The Works of Nicola Samorì

The paintings of Italian artist, Nicola Samori, are full of sensuous energy. The thirty-five year old’s style is derived from the classical paintings of early renaissance masters. With the highest degree of precession, his figures emerge from the darkness of pictorial space into the light with dramatic realism.

Samori’s methodology is one that intertwines both violence and romance, which make his paintings all the more painful: He distorts them, smears them with his hand, disfigures hem with the palette knife, paints them over, or like a torturer removes the half-dry skin of the uppermost layer of paint with a scalpel. Yet, through this destructive deconstruction, his compositions have an eery sense of beauty and elegance.